‘Second Monday Author Series’ comes to a close

MARY MASSRIER/THE ARKA TECH This book entails a small town in Mississippi where a cable repair man is suddenly sucked into a mythical world. He falls in love with a local woman.

Arkansas Tech has implemented a new lecture series on campus called “Second Monday Author Series,” which involves inviting local authors to come and speak on behalf of their successes as an author.

Tech invited Dr. Bill Eakin to partake in this lecture series. Dr. Eakin is most known for his numerous short stories that have been published in many different literary journals such as Analog, Apex, F&SF, Amazing Stories, Daily Science Fictions and Realms of Fantasy.

He is also known for his popular book series, “Redgunk Tales.” This book entails a small town in Mississippi where a cable repair man is suddenly sucked into a mythical world. He falls in love with a local woman.

Dr. Eakin has been nominated for as Science Fiction Writers of America. His success has lead him to help other writers develop their own success. He offered advice to better improve writing and how the road to success is often long but well worth it in the end.

Dr. Eakin started writing in the third grade after he realized the freedom that comes with writing and how it was a tool to display his imagination. He told a story of how in the eighth grade he was told to he was not a good writer because of his overly flowery language. However, to this day, he still uses flowery language in his writing and has stayed true to his style of writing.

He discussed how the process can be frustrating at times: “Sometimes it’s ugly and that’s the coolest part.”

Dr. Eakin has learned to embrace the flaws in writing and has gained the ability to overcome this and encouraged the audience to do the same. Find out what works best for you and stay true to your writing is what he emphasized.

He also explained how editing can make the difference in any type of writing piece. By doing this, one can ensure that a writing piece includes, not only intelligence, but heart and feeling, encouraging writers to not only get the facts but to draw in the reader with a touch of human emotion every piece.

“The most boring thing you can do is read a book full of ideas,” said Dr. Eakin.

Dr. Eakin has been passing along his talent with students currently as a philosophy, humanities, art history and creative writing professor at the University of the Ozarks for decade now. He is currently working on a novel about dependents of military families coming of age in places such as Guam and Okinawa, Japan. This includes fiction, memoirs, life and death and the breakdown of command.