History is being made Every Day

Nathaniel Palmer, from Little Rock, grew up with no role models, instead he strove to be the person he always needed, and has marked his journey through life by advocating growth from within. Nate, the name which he is more commonly known by, strives to give up the good for the great on a daily basis.

Amanda Hampton /The Arka Tech

The many positions of leadership that Nate, a senior in the College of Business, holds are a testament to his passion for greatness and leaving a lasting legacy everywhere he steps. He is the Creative Event Team Leader for the Student Activities Board and the Parliamentarian for the African American Student Association at ATU, and he is also a resident assistant in Paine Hall, among various other roles he successfully executes.

“Being a black student on this campus, for me, is not something you really think about. It’s something that you are,” said Nate. “I define black history as every day. A lot of history will be made today, there was history made yesterday, there’s going to be history made tomorrow, but for some odd reason we celebrate a month.”

In celebrating Black History Month, we celebrate the victories and contributions that African Americans have made to our history and development as a nation in remembering the legacies that outstanding citizens have left behind. Similarly, the legacy that Nate hopes to leave behind is one of never being stagnant in any endeavor that he may engage in.

“Often we don’t realize how much the world is changed by our inaction as well,” said Nate. He brings to light the reality that our individual actions contribute to a greater sphere of influence than just our own, and being conscious of this while carrying out even the seemingly mundane aspects of life is how history becomes established over time.

As previously mentioned, Nate did not grow up with a role model or someone to look up to. Because of this, he recognizes that he was not instilled with a clear vision in his youth, but rather he had to go through life as a process of trial and error to shape him into the man that he is today.

“Nate is a very well put together person. Working with him is great because he knows what he wants and how to use his skills to sell his events not only to his coworkers, but also to the students on campus. He really has that sparkle in his eye and knows what he is doing,” said Glen Poole, SAB President and theatre major at Arkansas Tech University from San Francisco, California.

Nate recognizes that he has, “come a long way from where he started,” and continually asks himself, “what’s next?” In doing so, he has developed an identity for himself that was never clear to him in his adolescence. Despite the lack of vision and individuality that he experienced in his youth, it is clear that he now knows who he is.

“Nate Palmer is a guy of many things, in hopes of being a guy of many greater things. Just trying to give up the good for the great in hopes of leaving a greater impact on this world,” he explained in regard to his sense of self.

In any setting and no matter where he goes, Nate tries to always selflessly involve himself in the affairs of others. He believes that a large part of his identity is “forecasted on the forefront” of how others perceive his actions and behaviors, but is always seeking to improve who he is in order to contribute to history. He describes himself to be an encourager, up-lifter and a believer.

“If you believe in yourself, others will believe in you. If they believe in you, they will up-lift you, and in the process of uplifting there is encouragement,” said Nate. This man exemplifies the golden rule of treating others the way that you want to be treated.

Nate Palmer is a hard-working, intelligent businessman who wholeheartedly dives into every task he takes on. With his philosophy of always putting others before himself, his drive for greatness, and his focused work ethic, he will without a doubt be a contributor to American history. Nate graduates this spring from Arkansas Tech University with his bachelor’s degree.

“We must never forget that Black History is American History. The achievements of African Americans have contributed to our nation’s greatness.” – Yvette Clarke