Four exhibits, one gallery

Michael Warrick explains how the art piece, "Mewmaw, Maw and I", was sculpted after his daughter (her social security number is on the side of the head). AMBER QUAID/THE ARKA TECH
Michael Warrick explains how the art piece, “Mewmaw, Maw and I”, was sculpted after his daughter (her social security number is on the side of the head). AMBER QUAID/THE ARKA TECH

The Norman Hall Art Gallery opened its doors on September 30 to showcase artwork from Michael Warrick. This exhibition includes four different series and demonstrates years of technique and skill through many multi-media platforms.

“I work on two or three series at one time,” said Warrick on how he has so many different series in this one exhibit.

The exhibit includes “The Seven Deadly Sins,” “Narrative Portraits,” “Meditations” and “Birds.”

Many of these pieces stemmed from his real-life experiences and world views. Throughout the four series, he uses a multitude of artistic styles ranging from ceramics to bronze sculptures.

  The "Lava Librarian" is a symbol of the librarian that's made of steel and can over come anything. This sculpture is made entirely of bronze. AMBER QUAID/THE ARKA TECH

The “Lava Librarian” is a symbol of the librarian that’s made of steel and can over come anything. This sculpture is made entirely of bronze. AMBER QUAID/THE ARKA TECH

“Getting to see the man, the behind [the scene] works [that were] as intimidating as the materials used to make them, brought a sense of relatability I wouldn’t have had otherwise,” said Uriah Greer, junior graphic design student from northwest Arkansas. “How he’d struggled with comps, how certain art methods were frustrating to him, how he found solace in nature and how all of that reflected in his work left me feeling like I could work at that level someday. That anyone could.”

In Warrick’s “Seer 1” and “Seer 2” he used cast aluminum with a texture that looks like fungus. He built them up with caustic wax for five hours a day over several days.

In his “Birds” series, Warrick used the blade of a chainsaw to make the markings of the birds’ faces. Warrick uses many different techniques in his art series.

Both of these series have a sense of what Warrick calls a “duality” of the internal and external world where “the mind on the inside is one thing, and the appearance on the outside is really the experience they are having in the real world.”

Gallery perusers. AMBER QUAID/THE ARKA TECH
Gallery perusers. AMBER QUAID/THE ARKA TECH

“I’ve experimented with a lot of different materials and a lot of different processes, so I can switch gears pretty easily,” Warrick said.
Warrick has taught at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock as sculpture coordinator and professor for the art department for the past 25 years.

He has also been a professional artist for over 35 years, winning numerous awards. His artwork is in international, corporate, private and public collections. His most recent award, studioMAIN’S SoMa Public Art Competition, was won in July of this year, and his sculpture “Serenity” is displayed between 13th Street and 16th Street in Little Rock.

“Create your own peace if it’s possible,” Warrick said to students at Tech.

For more information about the art exhibit, go online to www.atu.edu/art/gallery.php or visit the Norman Hall Art Gallery from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday.

For more information on Warrick, go online to www.michaelwarrick. com.

Amber Quaid
About Amber Quaid 52 Articles

Amber Quaid is the coeditor-in-chief for the Arka Tech newspaper at Arkansas Tech University. Her focus is on diversity and its importance for inclusion into society. Amber has a bachelor’s degree in journalism with an emphasis in communication and public relations. She is currently working on receiving her master’s degree in multimedia journalism. Amber has been in the professional world of journalism for 4 years and in professional management positions for 16 years with a Fortune 500 company. Currently, on the Arka Tech Amber does layout, design, and writes articles about diversity and mental health issues. She enjoys reading, hanging out with her kids and playing deck-building board games.